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Logan Library

Off the Shelf: Stories of Yesterday: Travel through the Archives of Schreiner's Past

Stories of Yesterday: Travel through the Archives of Schreiner's Past

Welcome!

This new year, 2023, will mark 100 years that Schreiner University has provided educational and personal growth to thousands of students. The library is celebrating this achievement through the exhibit entitled "Stories of Yesterday." This exhibit showcases the personal stories and archives left behind by past Schreiner community members. Please stop by Logan Library to enjoy the exhibit which will run Dec. 5-Mar. 15, 2023.

Canfield Scrapbook, 1927

Photograph from William Hale Canfield's scrapbook documenting his time as a student at Schreiner Institute in 1927.

-Canfield Collection

Photograph from William Hale Canfield's scrapbook documenting his time as a student at Schreiner Institute in 1927.

-Canfield Collection

Photograph from William Hale Canfield's scrapbook documenting his time as a student at Schreiner Institute in 1927.

-Canfield Collection

Photograph from William Hale Canfield's scrapbook documenting his time as a student at Schreiner Institute in 1927.

-Canfield Collection

Image: Schreiner Institute cadet milking cow, circa 1920s.

-Image: Portrait from Schreiner 1942 Recall Yearbook

Image: Schreiner Institute barn, circa 1920s.

Image: Schreiner Institute's barn with a cadet putting food in stalls, circa 1920s

Arthur Strickland was from Itasca , Texas. He attended Schreiner Institute from 1940-42 on a Dairy Scholarship. The following is his account of Schreiner Institute's dairy and farm:

One of the more unique scholarships offered by Schreiner Institute in the 30s and 40s was in connection with its dairy and farm. With an emphasis on work, the "dairy scholarship" offered a year of education with expenses paid for room, board, tuition, fees and supplies. Inasmuch as the nation was in the grip of the depression, such a scholarship (job) was a virtual goldmine.

Schreiner's dairy herd, a mixture of Holstein and Jersey, numbered between 30 to 35 cows. Each morning at 5:30, and each evening at 4:30, four cadets headed for the milk barn to do the milking.

A breed unto themselves, the dairy scholarship cadets lived in a small wood-framed house called "The Milk Shack" with a sign out front, no less, and located near the shop entrance of the campus.

One thing I do know, none of the succeeding Presidents of Schreiner held the dairy as close to his heart as did Schreiner's first president, Dr. James (Big Jim) Delaney. We all knew that was his dairy.

-Arthur Strickland Correspondence

Who were the Sponsors?

For the first three years of its existence, Schreiner Institute was an all-male military school. In an effort to not only educate young men in a military and Christian atmosphere, but to produce officers and gentlemen, a feminine tradition was introduced in 1928. That year, the three company commanders each selected a local lady to march with them in formal review parades (also called retreats) on Sunday afternoons. These ladies were called the Schreiner military sponsors. Evidently the program was met with positive enthusiasm because the tradition continued until 1971.

-Cathy Henry Correspondence Letter

Links


 

Exhibit Curator

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Sarah Sides MSc
Contact:
(830)792-7321
Website